pizzarogies

Here’s the recipe! You can scroll down for reviews and changes!

Grandma’s Polish Perogies (The dough needed for Pizza-rogies!)

Thanks to allrecipes.com!

Prep
2 h

Ready In
2 h

Ingredients

  • 4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 2 cups sour cream
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 tablespoons oil

Directions

In a large bowl, stir together the flour and salt. In a separate bowl, whisk together the butter, sour cream, eggs, egg yolk and oil. Stir the wet ingredients into the flour until well blended. Cover the bowl with a towel, and let stand for 15 to 20 minutes.
Separate the perogie dough into two balls. Roll out one piece at a time on a lightly floured surface until it is thin enough to work with, but not too thin so that it tears. Cut into circles using a cookie cutter, perogie cutter, or a glass. Brush a little water around the edges of the circles, and spoon some filling into the center. Fold the circles over into half-circles, and press to seal the edges. Place perogies on a cookie sheet, and freeze. Once frozen, transfer to freezer storage bags or containers.
To cook perogies: Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Drop perogies in one at a time. They are done when they float to the top. Do not boil too long, or they will be soggy! Remove with a slotted spoon.


Now here are the changes for the Pizza-rogies!

In a stand mixer (because it’s easier!), stir together the flour and salt. Stop your mixer and add the butter, sour cream, eggs, egg yolk and oil. Stir the wet ingredients into the flour until well blended. Mix the dough for 7 minutes on 1st speed. Cover the bowl with a towel, and let stand for 15 to 20 minutes. You will need to let the dough rest when you roll it. Follow the rest of the recipe normally. Freeze them first before cooking – there’s less risk of bursting.

We used pepperoni, marble cheese, and homemade pizza sauce. You can use pretty much any filling that interests you.

Why the mixer?: It develops the gluten and that allows the dough to handle the filling better. Traditional fillings are usually very soft, but a chunk of pepperoni (“because it can’t be diced!” says the husband) will rip the original recipe’s dough. Yes, I tried it.

You can really tell the difference when cooking them though. Granny’s dough recipe burst, the cheese melted through into the hot pan, and they were flat. The ones photographed were made with the stand mixer updated recipe and they were beautiful. The dough didn’t rip once, it was thinner, and when panfried in butter, the dough distended without breaking and created a wonderful crispy pierogi experience.

7 minutes for much better pierogies.

Even if you work the dough by hand, any amount of work that you put into the dough will be much better. Just remember to let it rest before starting to roll it out.

My husband has officially banned store-bought pierogies in our house. They were that good!

Here’s another helpful hint: Add the sauce and cheese first. Begin to close the pierogi and then use the pepperoni piece to shove the cheese down and out of the way of your edges.

 

  Happy cooking, everyone!

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